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Winter time is a miserable time for everyone. It’s cold, dreary, and depending on where you live, there is that dreaded word….snow. For some people, winter is dreaded because it causes more pain from their chronic invisible illnesses. Raynaud’s Syndrome is one of those such illnesses. Raynaud’s Syndrome does have symptoms you can see, however, if you don’t know the symptoms, you don’t know what to look for.

Raynuad syndrome

Raynaud syndrome, also known as Raynaud's phenomenon, is a medical condition in which spasm of arteries causes episodes of reduced blood flow. Raynaud syndrome is also associated with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue. Typically, the fingers, and less commonly the toes, are involved. Rarely, the nose, ears, or lips are affected. The episodes result in the affected part turning white and then blue. Often, numbness or pain occurs. As blood flow returns, the area turns red and burns. The episodes typically last minutes but can last several hours.

Signs and Symptoms of Raynaud’s Disease.

When exposed to cold temperatures, the blood supply to the fingers or toes, and in some cases the nose or earlobes, is markedly reduced; the skin turns pale or white (called pallor) and becomes cold and numb. These events are episodic, and when the episode subsides, or the area is warmed, the blood flow returns, and the skin color first turns red (rubor), and then back to normal, often accompanied by swelling, tingling, and a painful “pins and needles” sensation.

All three-color changes are observed in classic Raynaud's. However, not all patients see all of the aforementioned color changes in all episodes, especially in milder cases of the condition. Symptoms are thought to be due to reactive hyperemia of the areas deprived of blood flow. When exposed to cold temperatures, the blood supply to the fingers or toes, and in some cases the nose or earlobes, is markedly reduced; the skin turns pale or white (called pallor) and becomes cold and numb. These events are episodic, and when the episode subsides, or the area is warmed, the blood flow returns, and the skin color first turns red (rubor), and then back to normal, often accompanied by swelling, tingling, and a painful “pins and needles” sensation.

All three-color changes are observed in classic Raynaud's. However, not all patients see all of the aforementioned color changes in all episodes, especially in milder cases of the condition. Symptoms are thought to be due to reactive hyperemia of the areas deprived of blood flow.

Diane from Turning Clock Back says: “I found that increasing exercise (thus increasing circulation) was a big help. And when you do have those finger and toe spasms that cause them to go completely white, be careful not to use water that is TOO hot to get the blood flowing again. Warm water and hand massage or swinging your arms in wide circles to force the blood flow is the best way to get relief. 

Rebecca Louise Jones from Views from my Garden Bench says: “I wear fingerless gloves indoors to keep my hands warm especially when I'm typing at computer 🙂 I put gloves on before I go outside to make sure my hands are warm.”

Carole Griffitts from Navigating the Storms says “Raynaud's in my hands is more a nuisance than anything. I use gloves when outside anytime the weather's below about 50. In the house, they can get cold anytime. I usually wrap them in a blanket or even hold them next to the skin. Warm water has never really helped”.

The general consensus for dealing with the pain and cold associated with Raynaud Syndrome is that wearing gloves keep your hands as warm as possible. Not all gloves are created equal and some prohibit you from having full function of your hands. Glider Gloves has a set of gloves designed to help with Raynaud Syndrome.

For those looking for a lightweight glove to protect from sudden bursts of cold on a cool day, at home, or in the office, we recommend the Urban Style Glider Glove. These provide enough protection to keep your hands and fingers warm while allowing you to freely use your devices without the need to take gloves off, risking triggering an attack.

During the colder months, or for those seeking better protection than the lightweight Urban glove, we recommend the Winter Style Glider Gloves. These provide all the comfort and functionality of the Urban Style, but with another layer added for extra warmth and protection.

Glider Gloves

Why I love Glider Gloves for Raynaud Syndrome Relief.

I suffer from a milder case of Raynaud Syndrome, my hands can get very cold really fast. My desk is right by the window in my office which is not a good combination. I've tried different gloves on the market to try and type with while working. Glider Gloves are the only gloves I've found that I can be used indoors and outdoors.

Glider gloves at computer

The style I have are the winter style so they are a bit bulkier. They are perfect for outdoors in the winter to access my cell phone. I'm glued to my phone at all times and these gloves keep my hands warm and not hurt when outside. I am going to purchase the Urban Style for myself to use in the house at my desk. This will make working at my desk easier and less painful.

Glider glove texture

Do you suffer from Raynaud Syndrome or know someone that does? What coping mechanisms do you recommend? What do you think of these Glider Gloves?

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